Sunny Sweeney

Globe Hall Sunday BBQ Series Presents

Sunny Sweeney

Leslie Tom Band, The Barlow, The Threadbarons

Sunday, 8/4

Doors: 5:00 pm / Show: 6:00 pm

$20 - $22

This event is all ages

All sales are final. Review your order carefully, there are no refunds for any reason. Tickets are non-transferable. No tickets are mailed to you, your name will be on the will call list night of show. Night of show (1) bring a valid government issued ID and (2) print your confirmation e-mail and bring with you night of show. Come hungry! Check out Globe Hall’s award winning BBQ!

Sunny Sweeney
Sunny Sweeney
Sunny Sweeney is the party and the morning after. She’s the quip that makes you laugh and the truth that makes you cry, the devil that’s egging you on and the angel whispering that you aren’t alone. But those compelling contradictions aren’t what’s most interesting about Sweeney: it’s the depth and brazen authenticity she brings to all her roles that grabs you and won’t let go.“I’ve grown up doing the bar scenes, and you have to have drinking and partying songs there-–youhaveto,” Sweeney says. “Now, my songs are still about the same things, but I feel like they’re more mature versions.”Sweeney’s salty wisdom and Texas-hewn soprano have never sounded stronger than they do onTrophy, her anticipated new album.Trophyis a breakthrough––the album we all suspected she was capable of making. The wit and honesty that have always defined her stone-cold country have blossomed into confessional, complex songwriting for grown-ups, still whiskey-drenched and honk-tonk-ready. Drugs, death, the ex-wife, drinking, devotion, and longing for a child: it’s all here, raw and real.“I have not felt this good about music in a really long time,” Sweeney says from her front porch in Texas. “I’m really excited.”The success of artists including Margo Price, Brandy Clark, Kacey Musgraves, Miranda Lambert, and others make it seem like the world is more open now than ever before to smart women singing smart country. It’s about time. Sweeney is a veteran of the trade, and has logged her miles the old-school way. A three-year residency at the Poodle Dog Lounge in Austin––“It was a dump,” she says. “They didn’t even have a credit card machine or liquor license.”––along with improv and stand-up comedy experience went a long way toward teaching her how to hold a room of cynical drunks in the palm of her hand.The mastery of holes in the wall, major label stint, and serious songwriting chops make Sweeney something of a rarity: an artist with barroom cred, mainstream validation, and songs meaty enough for listening rooms. Or, asRolling Stoneput it in September 2016: “Sweeney is one of the rare entertainers who can hold her own at CMA Fest as well as AmericanaFest.”Produced by Grammy nominee Dave Brainard (Brandy Clark’s12 Stories) and recorded at Sound Emporium and Decibel Studios in Nashville,Trophygoes 10 songs deep without a single throwaway line. While Sweeney wrote with her longtime favorites including Monty Holmes, Buddy Owens and Jay Clementi, she has expanded her circle of collaborators in recent years. Lots of time writing with Lori McKenna, Caitlyn Smith, Heather Morgan, and others resulted in a deck that’s refreshingly stacked: most of the songs on the album were written by women. “I feel like I have branched out a little in the writing department,” Sweeney says. “And the record I ended up writing was pretty heavily written with females. While Sweeney didn’t intentionally set out to write almost
exclusively with women, the resulting songs capture the feminine experience with a combination of nuance, humor, and accuracy only possible because of the source.Album opener “Pass the Pain” is a perfect example of Sweeney canvassing familiar territory in a more complex way. “It’s a drinking song,” she says. “It all actually happened when I was going through my divorce.” Eased into with steel guitar and plaintive piano, the song begins with an indignant Sweeney demanding another round, but her brash confidence soon melts into a forlorn apology to the bartender reluctantly pouring her drinks, making the interaction and the hurt all the more real and sad.“Bottle by My Bed” explores a different kind of heartbreak with breathless candor. “I only call my husband baby cause I love that word / never wanted something so bad, that it hurts / even give up these damned old cigarettes / if I could have a bottle by my bed.” Written with the awe-inspiring McKenna, the song lays Sweeney’s soul bare and captures the agony of not having a child when it’s all you want. “That song is where I’m at right now in my life,” she says. “It’s the worst pain ever. When I wrote it with Lori, I never really even imagined singing it live––I certainly never thought I’d record it. Didn’t think I had the balls to do it.” Thankfully, she did. The song is important, not just because of Sweeney’s gut-wrenching delivery, but because it tells a story too seldom told.Sweeney wrote a total of four songs with McKenna for the record. “She’s my spirit animal,” Sweeney says of McKenna. The pair’s “Grow Old with Me” is a tender ode to finally finding love that can last. “Trophy” is a wry takedown of Sweeney’s husband’s ex-wife. A slow burn with finger snaps and sauntering bass, the song reclaims an insult and makes it a compliment to laugh-out-loud effect. “Nothing Wrong with Texas,” grapples with returning to a home that has an outsized identity you needed to escape before realizing it completes you.The album’s two covers sound like they could have been penned by Sweeney herself. Chris Wall’s subtly brilliant waltz “I Feel Like Hank Williams Tonight” has never been in better hands. “Pills,” written by Brennen Leigh and Noel McKay, tackles addiction and impending overdose with jarring empathy and cleverness. “It’s a story about real life,” Sweeney says of the song. “Brennen is one of my best friends, and we think a lot alike.”Perhaps most of all,Trophyis proof Sweeney knows exactly what she wants. “There’s a lot of personal stuff on this record,” she says. “I feel like the songs that get the strongest reaction are the ones that are the most truthful––the ones that have emotion. That’s my job as a writer: to evoke some kind of emotion. I want everybody who hears this album to come away with something, whether it’s to feel like they’re not alone or inspired or like they want to laugh. I just want them to feel something.”
Leslie Tom Band
Leslie Tom Band
From the first few notes of a Leslie Tom song, you’re instantly taken back to a time when singers like Patsy Cline and Loretta Lynn were winning the hearts of country music lovers everywhere. But keep listening, and you’ll hear a voice and a sound that is remarkably current, even timeless. This Denver-based songstress is defying the odds by steering away from the “Nashville style” country trends. Instead, combining relatable lyrics with her bubbly, sassy personality and an un-
mistakable voice (along with the occasional fiddle and pedal steel guitar), Leslie Tom stands poised to hit the mainstream with her own traditional-modern spin on country music.

Leslie’s self-titled EP is a highly personal project for her. Produced by John Macy and recorded at Cinderella Sound in Nashville, the record features a veritable “who’s-who” of legendary session players, including Lloyd Green on pedal steel, Country Music Hall-of-Famer Hargus “Pig” Robbins on keys, and long-time Garth Brooks guitarist Chris Leuzinger, among others. The EP also features a dusty-road duet with rising country star Kevin Moon on the song “My Only Addiction.”

From the twangy slide guitar and fiddle interplay on the Dear John kiss-off “Hank You Very Much,” to the honky-tonk-shuffle relationship reality check “Breakin’ My Own Heart,” to the familial bonds explored in both “Every Other Friday” (a nostalgic nod at Leslie’s relationship with her dad) and “Hardest Thing I’ll Ever Do” (a tip of the hat to Leslie’s daughter and navigating the difficulties and joys of parenthood), the self-titled release is, at its heart, about relationships, as viewed through a vintage country lens.

“What I love about the EP is that it’s the first record I’ve done where I’ve co-written all but one song on it,” says Leslie. “I have stayed very close to my traditional country roots.”

You can’t get much more traditional country than the artist Leslie chose to cover on this release: Her cover of Patsy Cline’s last single, “Leavin’ On Your Mind,” is a torch song rife with jazzy-bluesy piano that kicks up the tempo just a little bit without losing any of the emotional tug that made the original a powerful country classic. In a case of full-circle rightness, Pig Robbins, who played on Cline’s version, also played keys on this version.

Leslie’s pure country sound comes as little surprise. Born and bred in the heart of Texas, she cut her teeth listening to Hank Williams, Patsy Cline and Bob Wills on the radio of her father’s Ford truck. Her own musical journey began at age 7, picking up the violin and clarinet before settling on piano, and eventually developing her vocal skills and songwriting chops. Since those early beginnings, music has been an inescapable force in her life, and even her early attempts to settle into a corporate job after college couldn’t stick for long. For Leslie, a return to her country roots was inevitable, and once she made the decision, she never looked back.

In the years since, Leslie has sung on stage in front of tens of thousands of people, opening for artists like Josh Turner and sharing the stage with the likes of Lee Roy Parnell, Jeff Bates and others. She’s appeared on television music competitions, released two critically acclaimed studio projects and performed for enthusiastic audiences across the world. Her musical journey has taken her from the honky-tonks of south Texas to a stint in Nashville, then back to Texas before settling in Colorado in 2014.

Since her move to Denver, Leslie is seeing a fresh surge in her music career as her genuine style and heartfelt lyrics connect with a whole new audience. Released in advance of her third studio effort, Leslie’s latest single, the patriotic “Didn’t Think Twice,” is a moving tribute to her own grandfather, paying homage to the “Greatest Generation” of WWII veterans who sacrificed so much for our nation’s freedom, and who are now rapidly passing away. Featuring guest vocals by ex-Navy SEAL Pete Scobell, the single was released on Veteran’s Day, with proceeds going to the Travis Manion Foundation, a non-profit organization empowering veterans and the families of fallen soldiers. An alternate version of the single also appears on the EP.

“The song was purposely written so that anyone who is in the military or has been in the military will relate to it,” says Leslie. “I’m incredibly proud of the fact that 100 percent of the proceeds benefit the TMF.”

The best artists of any genre are the ones who are able to draw inspiration from the sound and style of the past, own it, and carry it forward to the next generation. No one in the business today does this better than Leslie Tom. In a day when so many artists are trying in vain to mold their sound to the current trends, she simply lives within the pure country sound and owns it in the process. Within the first few notes of the song, you discover what so many of her fans already know: Leslie Tom is the real deal.
The Barlow
The Barlow
Tasty country tunes from Denver, Colorado.
The Threadbarons
The Threadbarons
The ThreadBarons are Colorado's premier country-rock outfit.

The EP release, The ThreadBarons, showcases the band's mature songwriting - from the dark self-reflection of "Drowning Man" to the soulful twang of "12 Steps."

The ThreadBarons truly shine in live performances. Drawing their influences from artists like Bob Dylan in his electric years and Wilco in their prime, The ThreadBarons blend classic rock sounds with a modern spin that will leave you breathless.
Venue Information:
Globe Hall
4483 Logan Street
Denver, CO, 80216
http://www.globehall.com/