BRONCHO

Colorado Public Radio's OpenAir Presents: Bad Behavior Tour

Sold Out: BRONCHO

Pinky Pinky, BBQ Opens at 6pm!

Friday, 2/1

Doors: 8:00 pm / Show: 9:00 pm

$17 - $19.50

This event is 16 and over

All sales are final. Review your order carefully, there are no refunds for any reason. Tickets are non-transferable. No tickets are mailed to you, your name will be on the will call list night of show. Night of show (1) bring a valid government issued ID and (2) print your confirmation e-mail and bring with you night of show. Come hungry! Check out Globe Hall’s award winning BBQ!

BRONCHO
BRONCHO
Stick your head out the window and sniff the air: there’s a blizzard of badness brewing, and it’s not blowing over
anytime soon. Sure, the political leaders, bullies, and other villains of various venoms are dominating the headlines,
but these days the list of troublemakers extends well beyond the usual suspects.

From their home base in the Heartland, Tulsa, Oklahoma’s BRONCHO have a unique vantage point from which to
survey the sins. Churning out thoughtful, nuanced rock and roll with an art school spirit and a punk rock heart since
2010, the band’s fourth album, Bad Behavior, finds them leaning into their strengths for their strongest effort yet.
Following the catchy, playful vibe of previous albums Can’t Get Past the Lips (2011) and Just Enough Hip to Be
Woman (2014), as well as the deliberate sonic intent of 2016’s sludgy, moodier art piece Double Vanity, the new
record reveals BRONCHO’s fly-on-the-crumbling-wall vision of our moral climate, complete with a reenergized,
accessible sound and the charmingly sardonic, smiling-while-sneering delivery of singer and bandleader Ryan
Lindsey.

“It’s a reflection of the current world: everybody’s been acting badly over the last few years so we made a record
about it,” Lindsey says. “There are multiple ways of portraying something as ‘bad,’ and there are moments of selfreflection throughout the record as though we could be talking about ourselves—but not necessarily. It’s
observational, like we’re looking through muddy binoculars from a distance. It’s a blurry mirror image of the times
from where we sit.”

Lindsey (vocals/guitar) and the band—Nathan Price (drums), Ben King (guitar), and Penny Pitchlynn (bass)—are a
tight unit who have seen their songs featured at influential TV and radio and have toured the U.S. and Europe,
including arenas with the likes of Queens of the Stone Age, The Growlers, Portugal.The Man, and Cage The
Elephant. In the gritty warehouse district of Downtown Tulsa they have carved out a physical place for themselves,
an industrial blank space where BRONCHO can experiment with sounds, performance, visuals, and more. It’s where
they recorded Bad Behavior with producer Chad Copelin in the first half of 2018, a controlled process that allowed
them to work at their own pace and by their own standards, almost like a secret club.

Bad Behavior slinks and purrs with a sense of lascivious flirtation. Lindsey sings with a mischievous twinkle in his
voice, peppering his verses with suggestive uh-ohs and ahhs and at times barely pushing out his words to the point
of whispering. Lines like “You caught me in the weekend/You caught me with your boyfriend” (“Weekend”) and “I
got a thing for your mother/I got a thing to teach your father” (“Family Values”) match the primal pulse of the
songs’ moods and vibes, and their pop sensibilities create a world where T. Rex, Tom Petty, The Cars, and The
Strokes collide. “Keep It in Line” chimes along to a driving, pepped-up beat and serves as both the album’s catchiest
moment and its closest swerve toward ethical commentary, as Lindsey’s narrator demands to be reminded of his
place in the world while attempting to submit to his misgivings. The result is less an act of penance and more of
honest reproach, an ultimate judgment that is matched in its directness only by the following track, “Sandman,” an
overt yearning for pleasure that Lindsey calls the band’s answer to The Chordettes classic “Mr. Sandman.”
The record is filled with references to religion, sin, drugs, vice, and scandal bubbling just under the surface. It’s a
palette familiar to anyone who has ever turned on the evening news, which Lindsey admits was a huge influence on
him. “Through the writing process I watched a lot of CNN, and man there’s a lot of bad behavior there,” he says.
“Not to mention that there’s a company making money off of people watching their depiction of it all. From an
entertainer’s standpoint I get what they’re doing, calling everything ‘breaking news’ and keeping people glued, but
taking up that kind of space can’t be good for society. Although it’s pretty fun to watch.”

Can all this unsavory activity exist without taking sides? Lindsey holds tight to his role as a relayer and is
comfortable with leaving it to the audience to cast their own lot. “We’re assuming that everybody is coming from a
certain set of values, but ultimately that’s impossible,” he says. “There’s a lot of people who think a certain way
about the world and aren’t as shocked by these things. Maybe we’re simply trying to start the conversation. The best
news is just a report of what’s going on, without bias. This record is a non-biased, non-profit reporting on what’s
going on in the world. Part of it’s an exploration in solving those problems, on a personal level and ultimately on a
cultural level.”

Bad Behavior represents a picture of a band that have crushed their own commercial expectations and are doing
what they want to do at their own pace. They’ve cleaned the slate and quietly made a return with urgent, bonafide
pop songs. If you want to catch a whiff of Bad Behavior, simply stick your head out the window and breathe.

Their debut album Can't Get Past the Lips originally came out in 2011 and was rereleased by Fairfax Recordings in 2013.[2] Broncho released their second album Just Enough Hip to Be Woman on September 16, 2014 on Dine Alone Records. The album received generally favorable reviews from the music press.[3][4][5]

The band's song "It's On" was played over the closing credits of "Females Only," the first episode of the third season of the HBO series Girls. "Try Me Out Sometime" was used in an advertisement for HBO Now and Movie 43. The track "Class Historian" was used in a commercial featuring Kate Hudson for her Fabletics brand of women's athletic clothing as well as Cartoon Network's bearstack campaign.
Pinky Pinky
Pinky Pinky
Pinky Pinky have good gut instincts. During an era of limitless distractions, societal pressures and sonic trends, the three best friends are focused on being happy and blissfully on the outside of all that noise. The trio grew up together in Los Angeles and there's a shared understanding of what makes them all tick. Together with her punk cohorts Anastasia Sanchez (vocalist/drummer, 20), guitarist Isabelle Fields (19), and bassist Eva Chambers (19) have a clear understanding that PinkyPinky's modus operandi is in not overthinking their decisions. You can hear that on their debut album, 'Turkey Dinner' due on Innovative Leisure. It follows their two prior EPs, most recently 2018's 'Hot Tears'. Their first full-length, however, is even freer than their previous efforts. It's a patchwork quilt of garage rock and oddball indie. It's rooted in classic bass, drums, guitar, but it's bolstered by the perspectives of a trio of LA youths writing about their everyday observations, anxieties and passions.

For instance, “My Friend Sean” is a young fantasy about the dreamiest boy in class, “Mystery Sedan” is an LA story about a car being the only thing there in times of distress, “Lady Dancer” is about a stripper at a bikini bar in Los Feliz. When lead lyricist Sanchez met Chambers in the girls' locker room in High School they knew that they'd be in a band together (Chambers and Fields had already met in Middle School). All three of them had always dabbled in bands. Originally born in New York but moving to LA during childhood, Chambers began life in a band with her three older sisters, playing keys. She picked up a bass at the age of 13 after their endeavors had died a death. Fields, on the other hand, trained as a violinist but rebelled and taught herself guitar from the age of 12, while rearing herself on the Sex Pistols and riot grrrl bands.

Sanchez's father put sticks in her hands as a little girl. She was a prodigy in classical violin but also wanted to get back to the sheer pleasure of playing and so canned the anxiety-ridden music studies for her DIY drumming. She became a singer by necessity for Pinky Pinky, referring back to her love of Fiona Apple and even Heart for vocal chops. Pinky Pinky itself had a few iterations before settling on its three core members. “We were really trying to be punk at first then psychedelic then blues,” recalls Fields. “Finally we got to a point where we knew we didn't need to focus on just one thing. Growing up you think you only should listen to one type of music but we got to a certain age and realized we don't need to do that.”

During their High School years they flew beneath the radar. “Nobody cared I was in a band,” says Field. Their first gig was at the MOCA museum in Downtown. To date it's the most nervous they've ever been. “I'd still be scared to do that,” laughs Sanchez, admitting to almost having a full-on panic attack due to the swathes of cool teenagers that turned up to watch them. Only recently have they hired a booking agent after already building a solid reputation on the LA scene hustling by themselves. When they played Dave Grohl's inaugural CalJam festival in 2017 they didn't even have a manager. “I got a call from someone who works with Dave Grohl: 'Dave really likes your band',” recalls Sanchez. “And I was laughing like, 'Weird? But cool?! It was a little surreal'.”

In company, the trio exhibit an airtight ease together. In the studio too, their process is super collaborative. They tend to jam out a song idea first then pick out lyrical themes. Whereas their first EPs were overcomplicated and limited by a prior standard of musicianship, their LP has been created with more confidence alongside producers Jonny Bell and Hanni El Khatib in Long Beach. “It took a long time for our EPs to come out,” explains Chambers. “And by the time they did we'd grown a lot.” Indeed, by the time this album arrives it'll be the most accurate representation of where Pinky Pinky is currently at live onstage and off it. They aimed to make a live-sounding record that didn't feel too shiny in its production. As a result, 'Turkey Dinner' is unpretentious, raw and unpredictably zany.
BBQ Opens at 6pm!
Small Batch Oak Smoked Pulled Pork, Beef Brisket, Turkey Breast. Sandwiches, Tacos, 1/4lb Veggie Burgers, Mac-N-Cheese, Citrus Slaw and Potato Salad.

Grab a sampler Platter and try it all!
Venue Information:
Globe Hall
4483 Logan Street
Denver, CO, 80216
http://www.globehall.com/